Air Pollution level at a 20 year low in northern India amid lockdown

As per NASA report air pollution is reported 20 year low in Northern India amid lockdown. North India  is considered be the most polluted part of the country from ever since and the presence of highly toxic particles in the air makes it a hazardous place to live in. Amid the lockdown and closure of all industrial activities and transportation services which contribute maximum to the pollution levels, northern states are witnessing  cleaner air for the first time in the  past 20 years. NASA has recorded air pollution levels in north India at a 20 year low.

The pollution level is at its lowest level and the quality of air is comparatively satisfactory. The report prepared by NASA tracks the aerosol optical depth (AOD), which is the measure of how light is absorbed or reflected by airborne particles as it travels through the atmosphere.

Air Pollution level at 20 years low in Northern India

The northern areas have always been struggling with the contamination of air with numerous hazardous particles coming from various sources and have also been criticised for the same. The blockage of those sources have brought positive resulAccording to the report, ' AOD levels in northern India at the beginning of April were significantly below the norm for this time of year and the lowest in 20 years of MODIS observations. Ground observation stations in India have also reported a decrease in particle pollution in the region'. The stoppage in construction activities, restriction in travel and tourism in the midst of the ongoing lockdown is responsible for this reduced pollution levels all across the world. 

New Delhi witnesses a 61% drop in PM2.5 levels from the past one year. Pune records a 54% fall while Ahmedabad sees 53% reduction in PM2.5 levels. All the cities across the country are breathing cleaner air. It has been reported that particulate matter has started declining as PM Modi announced lockdown.

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'We knew we would see changes in atmospheric composition in many places during the lockdown," said Pawan Gupta, a Universities Space Research Association scientist at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. "But I have never seen aerosol values so low in the Indo-Gangetic Plain at this time of year.'